Putting people first

In 2018 we celebrated the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. This milestone provided an opportunity for Decathlon to reaffirm our commitment to actively promote mechanisms for upholding and strengthening universal human rights at all our subsidiaries across the globe.

Our responsibility at Decathlon is to ensure that these priorities are observed and respected at all sites where our products are manufactured, in 40 different countries, with uniform, consistent standards.

Our Code of Conduct, which was fully revised in 2017, addresses the social and environmental priorities highlighted by various international organisations (ILO, OECD, etc.), especially: human rights (child labour, modern slavery and forced labour, freedom of association, discrimination, decent pay, etc.), health and safety (management environment, building safety, etc.), chemicals management, environmental protection, sustainable materials, corruption, and employee management and communication.

We use an internal and external auditing system to ensure that the Code of Conduct is being applied, along with regular site visits from local Decathlon production teams. Our strategy for making the process more reliable and implementing lasting corrective measures is improving year after year.

In 2018, 86% of our rank 1 suppliers had brought human-related risks to an acceptable level, and our goal is to sustain 80% by 2019.

2018 ESSENTIALS

We strengthened the methodological content of our assessors’ guidelines so that everyone working in human responsibility in production will have access to a standardised framework they can apply independently.

We saw a significant increase in the performance of our panel of suppliers, going from 69% at the end of 2017 to 86% ABC by the end of 2018 for rank 1.

We are enhancing our risk analyses through our work on the duty of vigilance that aims to prevent the social (human rights, health and safety) and environmental risks associated with our business activities and those of our subcontractors and suppliers.

We launched our tackle forced labor programme internally, with support from multiple NGOs, to complement our auditing process and help detect the warning signs of forced labour and develop suitable corrective action plans.

PRATIMA SINGH
THE FULFILLED WORKERS PROJECT IN INDIA
Meeting with PRATIMA SINGH

SD IN PRODUCTION MANAGER IN INDIA AND FULFILLED WORKER PROJECT LEADER

WHAT IS THE FULFILLED WORKER PROJECT?
The idea behind the project is to work directly with the human resources teams at our partner suppliers' facilities to improve quality of life at work. Our focus is on a few specific areas: absenteeism, employee turnover, strikes and workplace accidents. We create a schedule with them incorporating a series of employee surveys that aim to produce a single indicator: employee satisfaction at the site. We launched this process in 2018 with five of our partners in India (six by the end of 2018).
WHAT WERE SOME CONCRETE RESULTS YOU SAW IN 2018?
We started by scheduling several surveys to assess the most sensitive situations and topics, as a way of responding to employees' needs and those of human resources management. These anonymous questionnaires are designed to provide insights for management into the primary sources of dissatisfaction, revealing the root causes so we can take steps to resolve them for good. The results also help us strengthen our existing initiatives. Each production site is unique, with its own areas in need of improvement.
We will be rolling out the project with other partners in 2019 so that we can take in the bigger picture and work on our evaluation methods. We will continue our improvement and satisfaction work with our partners in 2023.