Rolling out environmental management

Decathlon is committed to continuously reducing the environmental impact of our business activities, particularly the impact of manufacturing our Decathlon brand products. Our priorities in connection with the utilisation of resources, industrial water, soil and air pollution, and the impact of waste generated, as well as energy consumption and CO2 emissions must be shared with our suppliers’ production sites. The goal being to limit local populations’ and sports users’ exposure to pollution and to continue promoting active lifestyles at our production sites.

Since 2017, Decathlon has conducted environmental audits focusing on these issues at our suppliers’ facilities. We have identified and prioritised the suppliers for whom industrial wastewater production, air pollution and wasteful energy use may be an issue. A special set of specifications has been drawn up to help bring them in line with our requirements, with audits performed regularly.

These priorities are now shared with our industrial partners and suppliers, ensuring that they all take ownership of them, adopt them in turn and become autonomous when it comes to verifications and measurements on a daily basis.

2018 ESSENTIALS

We are training and encouraging more and more suppliers to combat local pollution, making them more aware of their environmental impact and helping them gain the skills to manage it on a daily basis.

We made significant progress in terms of the number of suppliers given a, b or c ratings thanks to closer monitoring of the suppliers who received d or e ratings in previous years, and we are working to find an immediate and lasting solution to address areas of concern.

We trained our industrial partners to measure their energy efficiency so that they could reduce their CO2 emissions.

MATTHIEU LEMMET
EXPLAINING THE REASONS FOR OUR ACTIONS FOR GREATER SUPPLIER ENGAGEMENT
Meeting with MATTHIEU LEMMET

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT IN PRODUCTION PROJECT LEADER

WHAT HAPPENS DURING AN ENVIRONMENTAL AUDIT?
Environmental auditors come in with industry experience because they are already Human Responsibility in Production auditors.
We always start by explaining the reasons for this approach to better address the audit priorities. So we go over the risks associated with pollution, the importance of using chemicals responsibly, and the impact pollution has on local populations and the environment. When inspections are performed on site, any irregularities are taken into account.
HOW DO SUPPLIERS REACT TO THE SUGGESTION THAT THEY MODIFY THEIR METHODS?
When suppliers understand that this is about more than just assessment criteria and behind it all is a way to create more value and protect people better, they want to get involved. The better this approach is understood and taken on board, the more naturally responsible and autonomous suppliers become. That is what makes our internal auditors so valuable: they can provide guidance and support for the action plans.
HOW CAN WE MAKE SURE THESE STANDARDS ARE MAINTAINED OVER TIME?
The key is training. We have to start with what we have observed, then develop corrective processes and offer the kinds of professional development options that operators need. These are long-term strategies that also promise lasting environmental benefits. Generally speaking, suppliers feel more engaged as a result of this support. They want to do better and quickly see tangible results proving that the steps they have taken are paying off.

“There is a lot of interest in the CO2 issue, both internally on our teams and among our suppliers, who ask for our assistance with this technical expertise. This is a long-term project that requires a great deal of human capital invested up front, but the ecological and economic benefits are tangible and long-lasting.”

ADRIEN JOUVINIER
ADRIEN JOUVINIER
CO₂ IN PRODUCTION PROJECT LEADER